Blog Archives

Experimenting with a few services on this blog

I have always tested a number of tools and services on this blog, to the point of sometimes making the page load time untolerably long (apologies for that – obviously not intended). One of the areas of experimentation is advertising, and you might have noticed sponsored links, banners, both on the blog and on the feed. My motivation is not to make money that way (I would not go very far with the amounts generated), but to figure out how mainstream consumer advertising programs "work" on social media content. The last one – that replaced AdSense – is , Amazon’s new advertising program called Omacaze Links. Initial results aren’t too convincing yet – but we’ll see how that automatic contextual matching combined with behavioral targeting performs. To date, I have received the best results from the FeedBurner advertising network inserting ads in my feeds.

I have also added a pretty cool community building feature called MyBlogLog. My … Read more »


A few data points about podcast advertising

MarketWatch’s Frank Barnako published a piece (free sub req’d) about podcast advertising, out of which a few nuggets of information are worth noting:

Podshow claims to have reached in Q405 their 2006 revenue target of $300 to $400K, and predicts sales in the millions of dollars this year. There seems to be a consensus that there’s money to be made by recycling established media in the podcast world, too. Michael Greeson, president of the Diffusion Group of Dallas, pointed out that NPR recorded 4 million downloads in the first two months it offered podcasts. Last summer, Greeson issued a research report projecting nearly 60 million people in the United States will be listening to podcasts by 2010. The report also estimated 15.5 million portable players would be sold last year; the tally was closer to 22 million. Cameron Reilly, the founder of the Podcast Network of Australia, is achieving between $40 and $100 cost-per-thousand on his podcasts, but … Read more »


Get ready to spot some RoofSense ads

The MIT Advertising Lab points to this picture of a building rooftop covered by the branding of the business occupying it (in the example: Target). It turns out, reading the comments related to the post, that this Target store is located next to O’Hare airport (Chicago, IL) – the busiest airport in the country, on the path of one of the runways.

The point though is that this kind of practice might become a new advertising mechanism, sort of the billboard-equivalent of satellite photos. With GoogleMaps and MSN VirtualEarth providing high-definition photos of cities, one could figure out some way of displaying advertising/branding messages on rooftops next to popular monuments or coordinates. As to whether this would overlap Google or MSN’s own advertising plans is another story.

Create any kind of new “real estate”, advertising will be one of the first leveraging it.

[via Search Engine Roundtable]


Brightcove’s “whole tail” advertising and delivery platform

Brightcove, the company founded by Jeremy Allaire, is disclosing its advertising platform offering in this Clickz piece. This goes a step further from the pre-alpha launch presentation Jeremy gave at the Web 2.0 conference.

The company has developed a platform to allow commercial video publishers of all sizes to distribute their video content over the Internet using Flash. Smaller publishers can use a self-service interface, while larger ones will have access to more advanced tools used by traditional broadcasters. Publishers upload their video, categorize it with metadata tags, choose a design template, create graphic overlays with their brand or an affiliate’s brand, and publish the Flash file.

Publishers will be able to monetize their content either by selling and serving their own ads, by running ads from Brightcove’s ad network, or by selling their content for purchase or subscription. The Brightcove platform allows publishers to create customized video players to distribute on their own site, or on affiliate sites. Brightcove offers … Read more »


The Facebook unplugged at Stanford ETL

I have attended last night’s session of the Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders (ETL) program featuring Mark Zuckerberg, the Founder and CEO of the Facebook, and Jim Breyer, Accel’s Managing Partner who is sitting on the board of the company after his firm led a $13M round of financing (at a rumored $100M-ish post-money valuation).The Terman auditorium was close to full to hear these two share their stories and experiences about the Facebook and its stellar growth. I have written about it in the past right after their financing, and actually this post is one of the most visited on my blog. Also check out their TechCrunch profile (and do read the comments from Facebook users).

Before I get into the actual session, here is an update on their metrics – which are (increasingly) stunning:

5M+ registered users coverage of 45% of US colleges (a total of 2,000 – representing 8M students) 80% penetration among … Read more »


John Battelle interviews Omid Kordestani

I recommend reading John’s interview of Google’s Omid Kordestani, who also spoke at the Web 2.0 conference (see SearchViews’ account). Omid was the first sales/business person to join Google in 1998, and runs sales and global business development for the search&advertising giant.

There are some interesting nuggets of information in this piece:

[Kordestani]  has to manage relationships with agencies that want more control over their clients’ campaigns and with publishing partners who see Google as a prime source of online revenue — and a long-term threat to their media businesses. Once [Google] proved that the text ads on Google could be successful and not interfere with the search experience, then it really turned into a science. We applied auction theory to maximize value — it was the best way to reach the right pricing, both for advertisers and for Google. And then we innovated by introducing the rate at which users actually click on the ads … Read more »


Data points regarding Google AdSense versus Yahoo! Publisher Network

Search Engine RoundTable points to a thread on WebMasterWorld related to the effectiveness, measured in revenues, of Google AdSense versus Yahoo Publisher Network. Message 9 provides a good summary:

I run Adsense and YPN on the homepage of my main site interchangeably to test which is better (equal pageviews at the end of the day, same weights). Both ad networks are both on target, although Adsense ads show more "less sophisticated" adverts (no brand name, mostly mom and pop operations); while YPN shows brand names. Google’s Adsense gives me double digit CTR, while YPN only gives me 1/10 of Adsense’s CTR. At the end of the day, even if YPN gives me higher earnings per click, Google gives me better revenues. It seems that G’s targeting is designed to show what ads fit the page AND what ads are most likely to get click (probably due to some historical data of my target audience or whatnot). On … Read more »


Categories and Players in Contextual Advertising

As the growing number of Web 2.0 rely on advertising as their main source of revenues, I read with interest a great summary published by SearchViews, on the four types of contextual advertising.

Search-based Contextual: serves ads matching the content of a site/page as precisely as possible.Google AdSense and Yahoo Publisher Network are by far the two largest players, with AskJeeves having recently launched their own network. Channel-Based Contextual: serves ads largely based on the targets/demographics of the channel (site or portion of a site).Value Click is the largest player in the space. Behaviorally-Based Contextual: tracks users across a network of affiliated sites in order to build a profile, that is then used to target the user with relevant ads, as well as generate off-line sales leads.Tacoda and Blue Lithium are mentioned, and I would add Revenue Science. In-Line Advertising: these are the big, annoying, roll-over ads that pop-up if you get too close to them on certain site, … Read more »